Thursday, March 25, 2010

Electrofishing is a Blast

Earlier this week I was out electrofishing. I was part of a team working to collect data on slimy sculpin that would be used to model riparian or stream bank health. The weather was cold, wet, and sometimes windy but we pushed through the majority of the sites. The team was part of a Canadian Rivers Institute research project led by Master's candidate Gila Somers. I became part of the team thanks to my position as Project Manager for the Kennebecasis Watershed Restoration Committee. The research is being done within the Kennebecasis watershed and thus I get to take part in this cool field work.

Electrofishing in March poses some issues, mainly water levels, glare, and cold temperatures. I had on my chest waders from Moffett's Pro Hardware to combat the highwater level, my polarized Ryders sun glasses from Outdoor Elements to battle the glare, and lots of clothes on to fend off the cold temperatures. This is one of my favorite field activities and one of the reasons I really love my job. Even when the frazzle ice is slinking around my knees, my nose is a freezing light pink, and the snow is slowly turning to freezing rain, I still have a big smile on my face. What makes this even more enjoyable is the fact that we are catching fish, a good indicator that the work the KWRC is doing, may be having a positive impact on the watershed health.

Where else can I get a headstart on fishing season? Which is just around the bend by the way. If you like fish then maybe you should consider buying a ticket to the Atlantic Community Church-Guatemala Mission Team's salmon dinner. Tickets are $20 for dinner and silent auction on April 10 from 6-9 at the Apohaqui Community Center in Jones Memorial Park. Stop by Backstage Music and pick up your ticket today and support the Mission work being done in Guatemala, where the team will build infrastructure, relationships, and hope in a small impoverished community.
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